Best Jazz Guitar Amplifier | Latest Review

The tone is critical to a jazz guitar performance – be it when you’re on a gig or just jamming out. Whether you are blowing or comping, the amplifier you use ascertains the ideal tone. Finding the best jazz guitar amplifier for that coveted clean, signature tone isn’t that simple. You should know what to look for in the right amp. If you’re new to jazz guitar amps, this could seem extremely daunting – which it is.

Therefore, we’ve done all the hard work and compiled the top jazz guitar amps list so that you could skip the heavy research part and go straight to the buying stage.  you can also check out our recommendations of the best jazz guitars too.

Our Best Jazz Guitar Amplifier Picks

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Brand
Model
Our Rating
Our Rating

Marshall

Marshall Studio Vintage SV20C

Our #1 rated
4/5

Fender

Fender ’65 Princeton Reverb

Our #1 rated
4/5

Roland

Roland Micro Cube GX

Our #1 rated
4/5

Fender

Fender Blues Junior IV 

Our #1 rated
4/5

Vox

Vox AC30

Our #1 rated
4/5

Fender ’65 Princeton Reverb

Our Rating
5/5

The Fender ’65 Princeton is a solid retro amp combo, dating back to 1946. It’s a rare breed that is still in production in some capacity. Originally intended to be a more portable, smaller combo for beginners, the Princeton Reverb soon fell in favor with studio players. Like the tweed Deluxe, the Reverb has seen an infinite number of recording hours over the years.

Kindly note this Fender Princeton Reverb is essentially a revamp of the classic legend. These jazz amps not just pay homage to its ancestors with its design language, but Fender has rightfully opted to keep pretty much all attributes of the original intact. The control setup, as a result, is fairly simple. There are a couple of guitar inputs, reverb controls, a basic two-band EQ, and a volume knob. The reverb controls comprise a speed knob, reverb knob, and an intensity knob.

At the Fender Princeton Reverb’s core are its complementing vacuum tubes. There is a single 12AT7, three 12AX7s, a 5AR4 rectifier tube, and a couple of 6V6 tubes. This setup is quite identical to amps that it took inspiration from. The power output rating is at 15W, 8 Ohms. All the power is pushed via a C-10R 10-inch speaker that justifies the entire package.

This single-channel amp Fender produces the cleanest sounding tones you would possibly hear in this price range. The phrase “vintage guitar sound” perfectly encapsulates the Princeton Reverb’s sound signature which is great for jazz. The best part is you could push the amp into an all-natural, warm overdrive with zero consequences.



Pros
Pros

Marshall Studio Vintage SV20C

Our Rating
5/5

Marshall is known for its loud rock amps. The Studio Vintage SV20C is yet another attempt by the company to recreate its yesteryear legendary tones, albeit in a lower-wattage, more compact head and combo forms. With 20W of EL-34 power that could be switched to five watts, this combo is capable of delivering JCM800 tones.

The Studio Vintage SV20C combo has a couple of EL34s for power. The electronics reside within a solid steel bodywork. The neat PCB layout, which is typical Marshall, features a mainboard that holds all valve bases. There are smaller ones for the rear and front-panel components that are connected with ribbon cables. The transformers used are smaller than average, which helps keep the weight and size in check.

The styling is quite classic, with a Plexi-style panel at the top, gold piping, vintage-style knobs, and yesteryear metal switches. The two channels have been designated ‘normal’ and ‘high treble’, and each comes with a low and high jazz guitar input. The S20C features a 10-inch V-Type Celestion speaker and it’s based on JCM800 2203, a circuit that heavy rockers hold very close to their hearts.

Sonically, the SV20C sounds like the era it took heavy design inspiration from. The regular channel is warm and fat. The high treble does what it says, providing an aggressive, sharp high-frequency response. On their own, neither channels shine, which is expected. However, when you connect both the channel inputs using a patch cable, the channel volumes turn into primary tone controls. Thereafter, it becomes quite straightforward to dial in the right balance, which could be fine-tuned using the standard tone knobs.

Pros
Pros

Roland Micro Cube GX

Our Rating
5/5

Specs, features, and benefits

The Micro Cube by Roland is a “micro” version of (you guess) the classic Roland Cube. What is really amazing with this little fella is the ton of versatility and features it has.

It has control knobs for Gain, Volume, Tone, and Master in the first section of controls. Right above them, there is the Amp Type rotary switch with eight modes, FX knob with Chorus, Flanger, Phaser, Tremolo, and Octave available, and Delay/Reverb knob.

It also has a built-in chromatic tuner and aux-in. The Aux in is actually a “Cube Link” too, which allows you to connect your IOS device, and jam along/record/learn with the “Cube Jam” app. On the amp, there is also a memory function, which allows you to save your favorite preset, and access it with a push of a button.

On the back panel of the amp, you can find the AC power Adaptor input, the Rec Out/Headphones jack, and the place where you put your batteries. It runs on six AA batteries that last twenty-five hours of playing time.

Pros
Pros

Fender Blues Junior IV

Our Rating
5/5

This versatile tube amp is ideal for Jazz guitar players as it produces nice and clean Jazz tunes. It carries a warm tone and may not have a robust sound compared to other amps.

It works well in studios and smaller venues with its 12-inch “Lightning Bolt” Eminence speaker with a spring reverb and a FAT boost. Furthermore, it is the perfect amp that you can grab and go to wherever you are playing jazz.

Furthermore, this Fender tube amp is a popular one among jazz guitar players as it produces nice, clean and overdriven tunes. It’s not too robust that it may not work for larger venues. It is well-suited in studios and smaller venues.

Pros
Pros

Roland CUBE-10GX

Our Rating
5/5

This popular modern amp has 10 watts of power which gives it robust sounding jazz tunes perfect for different kinds of venues. This type of amp being a solid-state may not be preferred by most jazz guitarists but this is an exception. With its three channels and three distinct effects sections, you can never go wrong with this. It is also equipped with a custom-designed speaker that delivers world-class sounds.

Furthermore, this solid-state amp is popular among jazz guitar players as it gives decent sounds and performance at a great price. However, it may not work for conservative jazz guitar players due to its many modern features.

Pros
Pros

Vox AC30

Our Rating
5/5

The Vox is a versatile amp that can help you play jazz guitar, but it’ also suited to many other guitar styles. This amp has a lot of features for today’s modern guitar player.

The VOX AC30 gives you both a top boost and a normal channel. The top boost features treble and bass controls. You can get everything from a clean sound to good overdrive with this channel. If you want just a clean tone, use the normal channel. The amp also comes with tremolo and reverb built-in. You get 30 watts of power so the amp can perform at smaller gigs. The amp is powered by two 12” Celestion Greenback speakers which sound great and produce plenty of great guitar sounds. The amp can produce classic British Invasion sounds all the way up to modern sounds, and it’s great for jazz as well. You can add effects via the effects loop for even more tonal variations. It’s all powered by 12AX7 and EL84 tubes, so you get those vintage tube tones that you want.

Pros
Pros

Fender George Benson Hot Rod Deluxe

Our Rating
5/5

For professionals looking for a gigging jazz style amplifier, the Fender George Benson has all the features you need to make amazing jazz music.

The Fender George Benson s a powerhouse jazz amp with 40 watts of power. This means the map is perfect for professional gigs where you need to be heard over the drums. It’s been created in collaboration with guitar great George Benson. It’s powered by a Jenson C12K speaker, 12AX7, and 12AT7 tubes. You get great tonal range, clarity, and superb sound for jazz as well as many other styles. This amp has three channels so you have many options in terms of sounds that the amp can produce. The channels are clean, drive, and more drive. You also get a 2 button footswitch to control your amp. It also comes with reverb to spice up your jazz playing. You can hook up pedal to it with the effects loop to expand the sounds you can get out of this exceptional amp.



Pros
Pros

Key Considerations When Buying a Jazz Guitar Amp

When it comes to achieving a good jazz tone, it is ideal to do some research first on the best kinds of gear to buy so you won’t waste a lot of money, time, and effort. This doesn’t apply to a good jazz guitar but also to the amp as well.

They both work hand in hand in achieving that jazz sound that is truly your own. Below are some key considerations when it comes to choosing the best jazz guitar amp.

  • Sound – One of the most important things that you will need to consider when buying a musical gear is the kind of sound that it produces. For jazz, it will have to depend on your preference. Some prefer that if it’s cleaner, it’s better. While others might like it dark, lush, or bright.
  • Tube Amp – Most popular amps for jazz are the tube amps. But you will need to take note that it has its pros and cons. This is for you if you want the best jazz sounds out there. Nevertheless, you will have to consider its price and maintenance as well because it can be costly and difficult to maintain.
  • Solid-State Amp – This contrasts with the tube amp. Unlike the other amp, this is less musical but is ideal if you want to produce a clean or a classic jazz tone. If you prefer a hi-fi kind of sound that is almost sterile, then you can consider this kind.
  • Tone – Some say that a transparent tone will give you the best kind of jazz. So you may need to consider this quality whether you’re aiming for a bright or a dark sound. Also, you will need to consider if it suitable to dark, bright, or both depending on your preferences.
  • Amp and Speaker Duo – You can opt for a two-in-one amp and speaker gear or go separately with these. If you are into portability and ease, you should choose the combo. If you want to produce quality jazz sounds, then you should have them as two separate equipment.

Conclusion-choose your best jazz guitar amplifier

The Fender Blues Junior II is our best jazz amp for beginners and those that need to practice. The other maps are also recommended for more seasoned players You’ll find a wide range of

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